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  1. Here’s a quick clarification about the place of the patriarchs and David, in response to a question I received by e-mail:

    I have a question (sorry): At the last slide Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and David are coloured in making it appear that they are not part of Jesus’ kingdom. Is this because they lived (on earth) prior to Jesus (Matthew 22:29-32 implies that at least the first 3 are alive, living with God I assume) and aren’t part of his saving work of the cross?

    Actually this is an example of the limitations of all illustrations. The reason that Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and David are coloured is simply that they didn’t fit in the non-coloured region! I wasn’t trying to make any particular statement about them, although I realise that when you look at the diagram it seems that I’ve deliberately excluded them from Jesus’ kingdom.

    According to the Bible, Abraham is certainly in Christ’s kingdom. In fact, he is the prime forerunner of all those who will be justified by faith in Jesus Christ. Abraham didn’t have all the available information about Jesus (1 Peter 1:10-12), but he had the gospel in advance (Galatians 3:8) and he knew enough to trust in the promises of God, and so be justified by faith (e.g. Romans 4:3). This also, I reckon, applies for Isaac (Hebrews 11:20), Jacob (Hebrews 11:21) and David (Romans 4:6, Hebrews 11:32).

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