Skip to content

I’m sayin’ something

On the Sola Panel

I’m with Tony. When it comes to telling you what to do in response to the issue of climate change, I’m sayin’ nuttin’. But I’m also with Carl Henry as quoted by Tony. So here’s some biblical truths that I am willing to say. Maybe they’ll help you to think more about climate change.

Creation matters to God. God reckons the world is good (Gen 1, 1 Tim 4:4-5).

Human consumption of things in the world is also good (Gen 1:29, 1 Tim 4:4-5).

The non-human part of creation matters to God, even when it’s got nothing to do with you (Job 39-40, Psalm 104).

People matter more to God than the rest of the creation (Gen 1:26-31). Strange, but true (Ps 8:3-8).

The big problem with our world is that human beings are sinners (Gen 3:17-19, Hos 4:1-3, Rom 8:20-21). God’s solution to this problem is the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Greed is close to the heart of sin, because it involves desiring the creation above the creator (Eph 5:3, Col 3:5). Mindless over-consumption is an instance of sin, and it is not good (Prov 25:16, 27).

The core business of Jesus’ death and resurrection is the salvation of sinners (Rom 3:21-26, 2 Cor 5:17-21).

The scope of Jesus’ death and resurrection is the cosmic reconciliation of the entire world (Rom 8:19-23, Col 1:20).

If you’re a climate change skeptic and a Christian, that’s no excuse to go on consuming more than you should. Put greed to death (Col 3:5). Be patient (Gal 5:22, Jas 5:7). Killing greed and practising patience will have good effects on our world, regardless of whether humans are causing climate change.

If you’re a climate change believer and a Christian, don’t allow your carbon-reduction ‘good deeds’ to be sullied with smug pride, self-righteous announcements, or condemnation of others who aren’t as green as you. Just do it, and praise God (Matt 6:1-4).

The gospel teaches us to love our neighbour (Luke 10:27, Rom 13:9-10, Gal 5:14, Jas 2:8).

“Love your neighbour” is not the great commission, nor is it the gospel.

In order to love your neighbour, you don’t need to be inspired with an extra economic or ecological mission or vision. You need to know God’s love in Christ, and prayerfully consider about how respond to this love given the relationships and situations you find yourself in.

If your response to people who say that we need to have a wider or global concern is to try to place limits on the command to “love your neighbour”, then you might be seeking to justify yourself (Luke 10:29).

When scientists collaborate, they will get things wrong, because they are sinners (Rom 1:21-23) and they are finite (Job 28).

When scientists collaborate, they will get lots of things right, because they are human beings made in God’s image. People who know stuff about ecology and economics will have some good advice about how to love your neighbour.

The entire world will be judged with fire by God (2 Pet 3:7-10).

The judgment of the world should lead us to positive ethical action, not to despair or complacency (2 Pet 3:11-14).

The entire world will be renewed by God (Rom 8:19-23, Rev 21-22).

The entire world will be not be renewed by you.

If you’re interested, I’ve said somethin’ about this elsewhere: Is God green? God, the world and us, Is God green? God, the world and Jesus and Is God green? God and the future of the world.

Comments on the Sola Panel
Published inAtonementCreationEnvironmentEschatologyThe BriefingWisdom

Publications by Lionel Windsor:

  • Lift Your Eyes: Reflections on Ephesians

All posts

Recent blog posts

  • Photo by Ruben Bagues on UnsplashLiving light (Ephesians 5:11–14)
    How should Christians relate to the world around us? Should we withdraw, or should we engage? How do we know which action to do when?
  • Photo by Ben Mullins on UnsplashThe test that matters (Ephesians 5:10)
    We live in a world full of tests and measurements. Believers in Christ should also test our lives. But when we do, we need to use the right standard.
  • Photo by Eric Patnoudes on UnsplashChildren of light (Ephesians 5:8–9)
    Believers in Christ have had their very identity changed: once darkness like the world, but now light. The challenge is to believe it, and to live it.
  • Dark tunnel coming out of the Amphitheatre, PompeiiWhat do you want to become? (Ephesians 5:5–7)
    Our dreams drive our daily actions. In 5, 10, 20 years, what will you have become? Living in grace as an imitator of God, or a partner with the world?
  • Photo by Jordan Beltran on UnsplashHoly talk (Ephesians 5:3–4)
    Often we try to fit in with others by the way we speak. But God calls believers to be holy, not filthy, in our speech, even if it sounds strange to others.
  • Holding child's handImitators of God (Ephesians 5:1–2)
    Christians are God’s dearly loved children, raised from death to life and secure with him, now and forever. This is what gives us the power to sacrifice.
  • Preaching sermons and shepherding the flock: What’s the connection?
    Lionel Windsor | 2 Feb 2015 | Priscilla and Aquila Conference | Moore College, Sydney I’m here republishing my 2015 paper, which originally appeared as a PDF and video. See here for more on the
  • Photo: NASA/ISS CrewThe Amazon Fires: A Gospel Response
    Unprecedented numbers of fires are now burning in the Amazon rainforest. How can the gospel of Jesus Christ be brought to bear on the situation?
  • Photo by Xan Griffin on UnsplashThe Victory of the Cross
    According to the Bible, Jesus’ death on the cross is God’s victory and triumph—a victory and triumph Christ shares with all who trust in him... (Audio)
  • Photo by Lina Trochez on UnsplashThe power of forgiveness (Ephesians 4:31–32)
    Believers are to forgive, as God has forgiven us. Forgiveness is not only possible for believers, it’s also powerful for our lives and relationships.

On this site

All content copyright Lionel Windsor