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Theological Education in Africa – a great need, can you help?

My friend Mike Taylor, who studied at Moore College in Sydney, is now principal of the Munguishi Bible College in Tanzania. Theological education is one of the most useful things we can provide for our African brothers and sisters. Mike is looking for supporters – perhaps you could help?

Here’s Mike’s letter:


Munguishi Bible College is the Diocesan Training College for the Anglican Diocese of Mt Kilimanjaro. It is situated in Arusha, Tanzania. We are a reformed evangelical College. Currently we have about 40 students, from all over Tanzania, who are trained to be ‘evangelists’ and ‘pastors’.

One such student is Musa (pictured here with his wife). He lives in a traditional Maasai area, with no access to electricity or water. Still only 22 he is head of his late Father’s extended family. He became a christian as a young adult, and has recently graduated from our 1 year Evangelist course. Christian Maasai are despised by their people and face many difficulties in proclaiming the gospel. Most Maasai, especially men, see the gospel as an affront to their custom and refuse to accept it. Musa patiently perseveres in proclaiming Christ against this hostility, and by the grace of God, the gospel is bearing fruit. We hope, under God, that Musa will return to do our Pastors Course, be ordained and continue church planting in ‘Maasai-land’.

All of our students are subsidised by donations to the college. They cannot study, and we cannot train them without the generosity of our brothers and sisters around the world. A student will typically pay about $70 per year for tuition and board. Realistically it costs about $1200. We continue to look for more partners in sponsoring students and funding our College to do this important ministry.

Munguishi Bible College has some income generating projects with a view towards self-sufficiency. We rent some land, and farm some more land. Our farm provides maize and beans for all the students and staff each year with enough left over to sell. Currently we are investigating a Solar-Light selling project run by the Anglican Church of Tanzania. This has enormous potential – but will take some time to bear fruit.

The college is carefully managed, and accountable to the Diocese and College Board. We strive for efficiency and accountability in all that we do. We meet the requirements of the Province of Tanzania for our Awards. Over the next few years we will start a Degree program. Our current budget is $70,000 per year. This budget includes Tanzanian faculty and other staff salaries, stationery, food and water, utilities, maintenance of buildings and other running costs.

It is our hope and prayer that you will partner with us in this strategic ministry. The church in Tanzania is crying out for humble, faithful, godly and well trained leaders—men and women who understand the gospel and proclaim the grace of Christ in word and deed. By God’s grace, Munguishi is producing faithful leaders for his church.

Please, will you consider giving a small grant to enable and sustain our ministry here. There are two ways of giving,

  1. provide a scholarship for one student: $1200 per year.
  2. give a donation directly to the College.

Thank you for considering this, and for your partnership with us.

Mike Taylor
Principal.


If you can help, please get in touch with Mike to let him know: mktaylor@cms.org.au

Published inMinistry

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