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Month: June 2014

Preachers and Leaders 3: Preaching as congregational leadership: a venerable history

The regular sermon, according to key figures from church history including Chrysostom, Augustine, Calvin, Cranmer and Perkins, is the key means by which shepherd-leaders fulfil their responsibility to ensure that the truth of God’s word is guarded, learned and obeyed among their congregations.

Preachers and Leaders 2: The speech of shepherd-leaders in the New Testament

In a number of places across the New Testament, we see a certain pattern of congregational leadership. Christian congregations often include certain people who are described as carrying a weighty responsibility. This responsible leadership role is based on and derived from the word of the apostles, which in turn is grounded in the Old Testament Scriptures. The congregational leaders discharge their responsibility primarily through speaking this word to the congregation, in a variety of ways.

Preachers and Leaders 1: A separation of preaching and leadership?

Among the many important issues and questions that have been raised during recent debates about women and preaching, one that has received perhaps too little attention is this: What exactly is this thing we call a ‘sermon’ or ‘preaching’? Preaching is the public component of the speech of a congregational shepherd-leader to the congregation under his care, by which he ensures that the truth handed down in the Scriptures is learned and obeyed by that congregation, in light of the congregation’s particular circumstances.

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