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Faiths in Conversation

faiths-in-conversationA Jew, a Muslim, and an Anglican Minister walk into a classroom … Here’s a 4-hour community teaching event I’m involved in, on 1 November. Faiths in Conversation, at Mosman Community College.

Come and join a conversation with a panel of three community members: Dr Shahar Burla, Israeli-Australian academic; Rev Dr Lionel Windsor, minister at St Augustine’s Anglican Church Neutral Bay; and Yusuf Khan, teacher of Islamic Studies at Mosman Community College.

We will be introducing and discussing similarities and differences between the three major monotheistic faiths: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will introduce core concepts of each faith and provide time for discussion among the presenters and with the students. In the discussion we will examine topics such as fundamental beliefs, texts, prayer, history and cultural influences.

Complete with cheesy promo video:

I’m looking forward to the event and the conversations that will start and continue! I’ll be speaking about God’s great news of salvation through Jesus, the Bible, what it means to pray to God as Father, the new Jerusalem we look forward to, and the influence of Christianity on charity.

For those in the Mosman area or surrounds, you can sign up here.

It’s been a pleasure to meet with Yusuf and Shahar and discuss our plans for the day. Shahar is a friend of mine too–in fact our daughters are best friends at school.

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