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Nexus 2016 Conference – Ministry in Exile

I’ll be speaking at the Nexus 2016 Conference for gospel workers, on 23 May 2016, on the topic of “Ministry in Exile”.

Check out the website to sign up. Here’s the blurb about the conference:

Nexus is a one-day evangelical ministry conference where fellow workers in the gospel can sharpen and help each other translate good theology into everyday ministry practice. Our program focuses on Ministry in Exile, how understanding the times will help shape our methodology and everyday experience of ministry.

Christians have always battled with a sense of not belonging. On the one hand, this world is our home because it is the good and beautiful place God created for us. And yet when Peter describes us as ‘exiles’ and as ‘aliens and strangers in the world’, we now immediately what he is talking about.

Perhaps more than ever before (in recent memory at least) the truth of this description is hitting home for Christians in the West. We see the aggressively anti-Christian stance of many of leading commentators and opinion-shapers, and the rising intolerance of basic Christian moral positions (such as on homosexuality), and we wonder what the future will hold.

At Nexus 16, on May 23, 2016, we’re going to think biblically and theologically about our situation—about the terrain and the time in which we minister the gospel ‘in exile’, and the challenge of equipping our people to live and thrive as Christians in an increasingly hostile environment.

Join us in Sydney at Village Church Annandale or if you’re not close by, gather some friends and listen together to the livestream (as several thousand people do each year).

Our main presenters at Nexus 16 will include Lionel Windsor, Phil Colgan, Chris Braga and Kanishka Raffel. Plus an extended Q&A between Dominic Steele and Phillip Jensen.

Published inBiblical theologyExileMinistry

Publications by Lionel Windsor:

  • Lift Your Eyes: Reflections on Ephesians

Recent blog posts

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