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Gospel speech: now available as an ebook

gs_265Gospel Speech: a fresh look at the relationship between every Christian and evangelism is now available as an ebook. It’s a short biblical exploration of the way the gospel shapes the speech of every Christian as they confess Jesus Christ with their mouth.

Here’s the publisher’s description:

We all have a different relationship with speech. Some of us love it, some of us… not so much. For some it depends a lot on the context: speaking on the phone with a friend is perfectly enjoyable; speaking publicly in front of an audience is our worst nightmare. Some of us speak at a million miles an hour, while some of us have a slow and measured pace, choosing every word carefully. In many ways, speech really is a reflection of who we are as individuals.

But if our speech really is a reflection of who we are, and if being a Christian is a fundamental and even primary way we describe ourselves, should we expect gospel speech to be on our lips?

In this refreshingly different look at what the Bible has to say about evangelism and our speech patterns as Christians, Lionel Windsor shows the connection between faith and speech, and encourages us to confess the Lord Jesus with our lips.

Key Benefits

  • Explores the important question of who has the job of evangelism. Is it just professional pastors? Or ‘evangelists’? Is my job just to live a godly life and let my actions do the talking?
  • Provides a fresh and biblical way of thinking about evangelism that bypasses much of the recent controversy and debate.
  • Shows that gospel speech is the job of every Christian, and confession of Christ is an integral part of the Christian life.
  • Gives practical suggestions and a variety of examples of how we can all share the gospel with others.

Useful for all Christians who struggle with evangelism and how to think about it biblically.

Gospel Speech is a spin-off from my more technical book Paul and the Vocation of Israel

Published inEvangelismMinistry

Publications by Lionel Windsor:

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