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Miscellaneous Bible resources

  • The meaning of the Last Supper: Luke 22:7-38 (A Sermon)
  • Galatians 3:28 – “Neither Male Nor Female”:What does this verse mean when it comes to male-female roles and relationships? Is it a “Magna Carta for humanity” that teaches complete functional equality of every human being in all areas of life? And what have Christians down through the ages taught about this verse? Michelle Philp explores the meaning of this much-quoted verse in its context, and assesses the history of interpretation of Galatians 3:28 from the early Christians to the present, with special reference to the phrase “neither male nor female”.Synopsis:

    This examination of the history of interpretation of Galatians 3:28 reveals that until the nineteenth century commentators understood Paul to be teaching a ‘complementarian view’ of equality for salvation which does not remove social distinctions/roles. No orthodox commentators on this text from the Patristic period through to the Reformers argued for a view of equality that blurred or removed distinctions. The departure from this historic interpretation is shown to have occurred in the nineteenth century under the influence of the Enlightenment concepts of equality where equality in one thing necessitated sameness in all things. The ensuing tension with other Pauline texts that assume distinctions were explained away using historical-critical methods from the same era. Drawing on the nineteenth century egalitarian understanding of Gal. 3:28 it is seen how feminist interpreters move a further step away from the traditional understanding due to their imposition of feminist culture on their hermeneutic.

  • Titus 2:3-5: Hand-me-ons: A sermon by Sandy Grant
  • Is the Bible Clear? The Bible, the Reformation and Postmodernism.
  • The Bible and Homosexuality – A summary of the current (2005) debate.
  • Open Letter to Brian Farran, Anglican Bishop of Newcastle, from Sandy Grant, St Michael’s Anglican Cathedral, Wollongong (Monday 11 February, 2008). Sandy Grant writes concerning Brian Farran’s public Statement regarding the GAFCON conference organised by conservative Anglicans and critical of the Archbishop of Sydney, Peter Jensen’s involvement in it.
  • Women teaching men the Bible – what’s the problem?A paper by Sandy Grant in response to Graham Cole.
    • Also available in PDF.
  • God in a Box? Stuart Starr, from Figtree Anglican Church, helps Christians to ask some important questions about the “discovery” of Jesus’ tomb.

Recent blog posts

  • The planSo here’s the plan (Ephesians 1:8–10)
    The God of the universe has a plan to sum up all things in Christ. He’s revealed that plan to us, and is putting it into effect through the gospel.
  • Are you trying to redeem yourself? (Ephesians 1:6b–7)
    When it comes to God, we can’t redeem ourselves. Redemption is something that God has to do—and has done—for us. This is why it’s such a wonderful thing.
  • What if it’s not about me? (Ephesians 1:4–6a)
    The Bible gives us a vision for living life that’s the exact opposite of the narcissistic attitude. This is highly confronting, and profoundly comforting.
  • Figtree Anglican Church Life Group Leaders Breakfast February 2019Overview of Romans 1–5: PowerPoint
    An overview of the logic of Romans 1–5 (PowerPoint file)
  • Sun over city#inChrist (Ephesians 1:3)
    Ephesians starts with an explosion of praise for the ‘blessings’ God has given to us. But they’re different from the kind of blessings we often talk about.
  • This GodThis God (Ephesians 1:2)
    Many people believe in ‘God’. But the word ‘God’ means different things to different people. What does the Bible say about God: who he is and what he’s like?
  • Amazing HolinessAmazing holiness (Ephesians 1:1b)
    God sees believers in Jesus as holy. This fact is amazing, especially when you grasp the history of the gospel going out from Israel to the nations.
  • Paul: in his own wordsPaul: in his own words (Ephesians 1:1a)
    Who do you think the Apostle Paul is? It's worth listening carefully to the words Paul himself chooses to define his own identity at the start his letter.
  • Lift Your EyesLift Your Eyes: Introducing Ephesians
    When believers in Jesus were in danger of losing heart, Paul wrote Ephesians. This letter lifts our eyes to see God’s amazing plan through Jesus Christ.
  • From temple to meat market in ancient Pompeii
    A very quick journey from the temple of Jupiter in Pompeii to the meat market. This helps us to understand 1 Corinthians 8-10 and probably also Romans 14.

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