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Greek

Latest resources (2009 onwards)

Vocabulary Resources

Greek Flash cards for Microsoft Excel

  • A fully functional Greek Flashcard program for memorising vocabulary
  • Requires Microsoft Excel 97 or above (included in Microsoft Office standard edition)
  • Doesn’t need any other Flashcard software to run

Remata: Eric Miller, Software Engineer and Professor of Bible and Biblical Languages at Quartz Hill School of Theology, has optimised and upgraded my initial Greek vocab spreadsheet to work on a number of platforms. Remata is freely available for download and I reckon it’s a significant improvement on my own efforts – I suggest you check our Remata first before you download anything from this site!

On this site, there are currently four word lists available

  1. Every word in the Greek New Testament (thanks Mike Turner)
  2. Moore College Greek – First Year
  3. Moore College New Testament – Second Year Set Texts
    • Covers all words for second year set texts (2004)
      • John 1-4, 13-17
      • Romans 1-4
      • 1 Corinthians 1-2, 12, 14, 15
      • With frequency in the New Testament (words under 10 included but selected out by default).
    • Download it here
  4. Moore College New Testament – Third Year Set Texts
    • Covers all words for third year set texts (2004)
      • Romans 1-8
      • 1 Corinthians 1-4, 12-15
      • Hebrews 1-4
      • 1 Peter 1-3
      • With frequency in the New Testament (words under 10 included but selected out by default).
    • Download it here

Palm cards

Printable palm cards for Microsoft Excel (requires decompression using a Unzip program). Thanks Rodney Kerr!

Prepositions: Visual

  • Prepositions: Diagrams of Greek prepositions for easy memorisation by visual learners
  • PowerPoint Prepositions: A dynamic learning tool for visual memorisation of Greek Prepositions (thanks to Andre Wheeley and Ben Gooley)

Verbs: Principal parts

Morphology Resources

  • Feeling Greek (PDF): This course is designed as a simple, phonics-based introduction to New Testament Greek. It can be used as a ‘refresher’ for students of Greek who have found themselves struggling with the complexities of the language at an advanced level and need to remind themselves of the basics; or as a basic-level introduction for new students of the language who appreciate learning a few simple rules with intensive ‘drills’ rather than extensive amounts of miscellaneous information.
    • At this stage, I have only completed the first 10 chapters – enough to give you a complete foundation in morphology and to begin applying this to nouns, etc. I’m putting it up in this draft form because I’d appreciate feedback about the course – especially feedback about whether you think it would be useful for me to add more chapters to develop this into a full-blown course in the shape of the Greek language.
  • Greek Morphology (PDF): A concise (11 A4 pages) tabular summary of everything that needs to be memorised for first year Greek morphology (ie the ‘shape’ of the language) at Moore Theological College. It is intended for those who want to keep memorisation to a minimum and work things out from first principles.

Grammar Resources

These macros were written for Word 2003. Unfortunately it seems that these macros don’t work so well on Word 2007 and beyond. Sorry about that.

Grabble

Grabble: The game for teaching one another Greek vocabulary. Based on Scrabble.

Fonts

To use most of these resources you will need three TrueType fonts:

  1. “bwgrkl” (from the Bibleworks website)
  2. “Symbol” (available with Microsoft Windows)
  3. “TekniaGreek” (from the Teknia Language Tools website)

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