Skip to content

Why does everyone want Jesus to get married?

From The Briefing:

It’s déjà Vinci time. There’s been lots of hype recently, but here’s my summary of the publicly known facts:

  1. A few centuries after Jesus was around, various people had various ideas about various things.
  2. Some people living at some point up to 300 years after Jesus lived possibly claimed that Jesus had a wife.
  3. Some of these people wrote their ideas down in story-form.
  4. A small bit of the thing they wrote seems to have been found recently by somebody somewhere, and has been purchased by an anonymous collector.

The important question is not, of course, whether these facts prove anything about Jesus’ actual marital status (obviously, when you think about it, they don’t). The important question is why “Jesus’ wife” has turned into such a big story in the media. In other words: Despite such flimsy evidence, why do so many people want Jesus to be married?

Maybe it’s because many of us are deeply suspicious of the organised, institutional “church”, so we’re predisposed to believe anyone who casts doubt on the writings of the New Testament and the Christian message, without properly checking it out.

Maybe it’s because we assume sex makes us human. Sexuality and sexual relationships are so often seen today as keys to our self-definition and our identity. If Jesus were married, he’d be a powerful pin-up boy for the quest to put sexual expression at the core of our own humanness.

Maybe there’s other reasons too. But if the possibilities I listed do happen to ring true to you or to your friends, here are some suggestions.

Firstly: If you want to check out the Christian text with the most ancient public manuscript evidence, read John’s Gospel. The earliest manuscript fragment, from the early 2nd century, is in Manchester UK, and it’s free to the viewing public (I viewed it last year).1

Secondly: Please realise that the New Testament (as well as the church’s historical teaching) strongly affirms Jesus’ humanity. But Jesus’ humanity is not defined primarily in terms of sexual expression. Personally, I reckon that’s great news! For one thing, it’s a powerful affirmation of the value of singleness. It also helps us to avoid running after sex and marriage–which so often disappoint–to fulfil our deepest desires. Most importantly, it helps us to see that there is something far greater to life, something which Jesus himself gives: a union with God as our loving heavenly Father.

Comments are closed on this post; see Tony’s article for why.


Comments at The Briefing.

Published inThe Briefing

Publications by Lionel Windsor:

  • Iso-chats: Theology

All posts

Recent blog posts

  • The powerful Christian life: according to Ephesians
    What do we do when we feel weak in the face of powerful people? Here are seven key reflections on power from Ephesians.
  • Liturgy Song – Moore College Revue 2020
    Here's a tribute to our online chapel experience in mid-2020 at Moore College, in the full spirit of parody. I wrote it for our Moore College Revue, and had much fun performing it with Jordan Smith and Monique New.
  • My grandfather’s part in a WWII mission over Modane
    A journey of discovery of some of my family history. My maternal grandfather, Allan Fisher DFC, flew a mission over a rail yard in Modane.
  • Youth praying, Finchale PrioryWhat can we learn about prayer from Ephesians?
    Prayer: What are you doing when you pray? Who are you praying to? Why does it matter? Here are three reflections on prayer from my series on Paul's letter to the Ephesians. #liftyoureyes
  • Salvation in Ephesians
    Here are the key reflections on the topic of salvation in Ephesians in my series Lift Your Eyes: Reflections on Ephesians
  • Photo by Bruno Aguirre on UnsplashWho are “the saints” in Ephesians?
    Who are "the saints" in Ephesians? Only Jewish believers in Christ? Or all believers in Christ? Here's my answer.
  • Ministry and mission in Ephesians
    Here are the key reflections on the topic of ministry and mission in Ephesians in my series Lift Your Eyes: Reflections on Ephesians
  • This GodThe doctrine of God in Ephesians
    Here are the key reflections on the topic of The doctrine of God in Ephesians in my series Lift Your Eyes: Reflections on Ephesians
  • Humility in Ministry #3 (Romans 11)
    God achieves his purposes through the gospel—with you and without you. A sermon on Romans 11 at Moore College chapel.
  • Humility in Ministry #2 (Romans 10)
    Since the gospel is about believing not achieving, Christian ministry is about speaking not achieving. A sermon on Romans 10 at Moore College chapel.

On this site

All content copyright Lionel Windsor